Basic Needs and Delighters

How to find out user needs? Which method to choose?

These questions find an innovative answer in an article from Ilka Willand (of Destatis, the German Statistical Office) published in number 31 of IAOS’ Statistical Journal

Beyond traditional customer surveys: The reputation analysis
Authors: Willand, Ilka
DOI: 10.3233/sji-150866
Journal: Statistical Journal of the IAOS, vol. 31, no. 2, 2015

Here a short version with pieces taken from this article:


‘An important strategic goal of Destatis is to continuously collect information about the customer satisfaction and the perception of important stakeholders and target groups. We conduct frequent customer surveys since 2007. But not all important stakeholders and target groups are necessarily registered customers. To learn more about their demands a reputation analysis was conducted in 2013 in cooperation with a market researcher. To determine a manageable frame for the study, we focused on three target groups: Respondents (households and enterprises), fast multipliers (online and data journalists) and young multipliers (young academics). The analysis was mainly based on the “Kano-Model”, a methodological approach, which is often used in quality management and product development. In the following article the survey design and the main results will be presented.’

Basic needs and Delighters

‘The most important category is the basic needs. Basic needs are taken for granted and they are typically unspoken. If they are fulfilled, they do not increase satisfaction. If they are not fulfilled, they will cause dissatisfaction.
Delighters are unexpected features that make customers happy. They do not necessarily cause dissatisfaction when not fulfilled, because they are not expected.’

 Three Target Groups in Focus

‘To determine a manageable frame we focused on three target groups who became increasingly important for the work of the Federal Statistical Office in the past years:
a) Respondents (households, enterprises)
b) Fast multipliers (online and datajournalists)
c) Young multipliers (young graduates and PhD students of social and economic sciences).

‘Target groups were asked for their basic needs and delighters concerning data search, data use and the reporting process.
On a scale from 0 (very bad) to 7 (very good) the reputation values are 5.3 for the fast and the young multipliers, 4.7 for the households and 4.6 for the enterprises.’




‘Most important basic needs and delighters: Especially for the responding enterprises it is a basic need important to get survey results after the survey is completed. A telephone service is a basic need especially for the bigger companies and the households to support the reporting process.
It is a delighter for enterprises to respond only online. This is currently being implemented in Germany, regardless of the results of the survey.’


Fast Multipliers

Most important basic needs and delighters: Fast multipliers expect more than databases and datasets. For almost every second a telephone-support is a basic need. This is quite interesting because there are many internal discussions at Destatis to give up that service for the journalists. Also they expect to find data they are looking for as fast as possible and for free on the internet. After an average of 14 minutes of searching on the Destatis website they will contact the information service if they are not able to find what they are looking for. To satisfy their basic need to find data as quick as possible we have to improve the search engine.
Most of our data is already available for free. Interactive charts would delight most of the journalists. Application programming interfaces (APIs) to grab huge amounts of primary data are the delighter especially for the data journalists.’


Young Multipliers

Most important basic needs and delighters: There are intersections between the young and the fast multipliers. Young multipliers also want data as fast as possible and for free on the internet. Most of the PhD students expect detailed methodological descriptions related to the datasets. What are the delighters? Surprisingly one half of the young academics mentioned examples on how to read tables and charts as a delighter. Similar to the fast multipliers we have overestimated their statistical knowledge in the past. Already more than one third of them see the opportunity to search for data via smartphone or tablet as a delighter. That means we have to offer more appropriate publication formats in the future.’


Results at a Glance


 See also

Ilka Willand got the award at IMAODBC 2013 for presenting this reputation study. See he slides at


‘Better Data. Better Lives’ is a very well made video about the role of statistics. Everybody agrees that data are necessary for evidence based decisions and progress. But all communication work has to deal with the problem that striking examples demonstrating this connection are not easy to be presented. Perhaps in the next video? ;-)

Broader Measures

The 46th session of the United Nations Statistcal Commission from 3 to 6 March 2015 at UN Headquarters in New York will deal with a report on broader (and better) measures of progress. This ‘report presents a roadmap for the development and implementation of an indicator and monitoring framework for the post-2015 development agenda. In particular the report discusses the development of the post-2015 indicator framework.’

Listicles: Where Stats are Popular


There are many forms statistical information can be published. In most cases Official Statistics use press releases or reports or single tables to be downloaded, some also (more and more) visualisations.

But it’s quite rare that rankings or numbered lists are used. And just these forms are among the most popular and attract attention. Who or what is biggest, smallest, first, best? Listicles answer such popular questions: ‘listicle is a short-form of writing that uses a list as its thematic structure, but is fleshed out with sufficient copy to be published as an article’ Wikipedia explains.



Also Huffpost does it and …

…  gives a listicle with 8 reasons to avoid listicles



The  phenomenon of written lists Explained (?)

Steven Poole from The Guardian on the crucial facts about the internet phenomenon of written lists and ‘top nine things you need to know about ‘listicles”:
‘Psychologically, the listicle is seductive because it promises upfront to condense any subject into a manageable number of discrete facts or at least factoids. When you embark on reading an ordinary article, you have no way of knowing how many things it will tell you. Maybe 15, maybe two. Frustrating. Plus, if you’re reading online and it’s more than a single screen long, you can’t be sure when it’s going to end. A listicle keeps helpfully informing you how much of it there is left. Great! You’ve now read three out of nine! Keep going!’

Arika Okrent, in University of Chicago Magazine writes about ‘The listicle as literary form’ and gives -as a conclusion – a list of Eight fun facts about the listicle:
‘1.     A listicle is an article in the form of a list.
2.     It is kind of like a haiku or a limerick.
3.     It has comforting structure.
4.     It makes pieces.
5.     It puts them in an order.
6.     Language does that too.
7.     Sometimes with great difficulty.
8.     Lists make it look easier.’

Rachel Edidin from WIRED gives ‘5 Reasons Listicles Are Here to Stay, and Why That’s OK’

And Maria Konnikova from The New Yorker gives ‘A List (yes!) of Reasons Why Our Brains Love Lists’:
‘In the current media environment, a list is perfectly designed for our brain. We are drawn to it intuitively, we process it more efficiently, and we retain it with little effort. Faced with a detailed discussion of policies toward China or five insane buildings under construction in Shanghai, we tend to choose the latter bite-sized option, even when we know we will not be entirely satisfied by it. And that’s just fine, as long as we realize that our fast-food information diet is necessarily limited in content and nuance, and thus unlikely to contain the nutritional value of the more in-depth analysis of traditional articles that rely on paragraphs, not bullet points.’


And Official Statistcs?  …… Bar Charts as Hidden lists

(Official) Statistics are a big provider of lists too …. but they do it not in a very prominent way, often hidden in visualisations. Bar charts compare countries, resources.

Sometimes quite modestly …


Sometimes explicitly,,,



Frightfully Boring? Not at all!

Statistical information is frightfully boring, it doesn’t regard me as a person! Yes and no. Yes, official statistics is not interested in a single person, data protection forbids this. But no, on a aggregated level we can find a lot of knowledge about our own situation. Interactive applications offer this.

There’s a quite new own from UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS). ‘UNESCO is making data count for the millions of children still being denied their right to education by benchmarking and monitoring global progress on education-related Millennium Development Goals and Education for All targets.’
Mind the Gap, a new online tool highlights the situation of girls and women in education.


2013-10-20_UNESCO-CH-profileABS Census Spotlight

But my favourite from a presentation view is still the Australian Census Spotlight, the new version with a personal infographic and social media link. Why? Perhaps it’s because there’s a speaker helping me navigating the information and leading me to some insights about the group of persons I belong to.


Open Data Literacy

Governments opening data is one step, the public making use of these data is the other one.
And not a guaranteed one. As a guest blog on Harvard Business Review’s Blog says: ‘the goal is for this data to become actionable intelligence: a launchpad for investigation, analysis, triangulation, and improved decision making at all levels….. While the “opening” has generated excitement from development experts, donors, several government champions, and the increasingly mighty geek community, the hard reality is that much of the public has been left behind, or tacked on as an afterthought. So how can we support “data-literacy” across the full spectrum of users, including media, NGOs, labor unions, professional associations, religious groups, universities, and the public at large?’

OGD Toolkit

The World Bank adresses this question and provides an Open Government Data Toolkit: ‘So, now that this data has been ‘opened’, how can it capture attention and imaginations of the full spectrum of users? How can we focus on the other side – the demand side – of the open data phenomenon? How can we grow communities of data users, and encourage data ‘ownership’ by the media, civic hackers, community groups, NGOs, labor unions, professional associations, universities, and more?’



IMAODBC 2013: And the winner is …

The Best-Presentation Award of the International Marketing and Output Database Conference IMAODBC 2013 in Neuchâtel/Switzerland goes to Ilka Willand from the  German Federal Statistical Office destatis.

Ilka presented the reputation analysis 2013 of destatis which aims at getting information about  target groups for statistical information – also the ones not reached (yet).

Target Groups

There’s a new target group approach:

2013-09-28_Willand-targetgroupsFirst results (more to come later)

First results of the not yet finished survey show how these groups search statistical information and how they want to access this information (green: preferred behaviour, red: not preferred behaviour).
Interesting: In Germany social media are considered to be for private use only, not for accessing official statistics .. :


2013-09-28_Willand-firstresukts03Here is the full presentation (link)