My World: The new development agenda

The new development agenda of UN

To know people’s priorities and views for a better life is the aim of the global survey lead actually by the UN.

The results will help defining the next development agenda for the world after the Millenium Development Goals MDG.




Results of My World Survey by April 2014


All about

Here you can fnd more about the background of the post-2015 global development agenda


For Everyone

The World Wide Web’s birthday! ( And a greeting address from Tim Bernetrs-Lee:


‘By working together, I believe we can build a Web that truly is for everyone: one that is accessible to all, from any device, and one that empowers all of us to achieve our dignity, rights and potential as humans. Let’s use this landmark birthday as a crucial step on that path.’ (T. B-L)

World Wide! World Wide?


2014-03-13_webwewant‘ the actions of some companies and some governments threaten our fundamental freedoms on the Web.’

A segmented WWW is no longer a WWW.


Some events in WWW’s curriculum

To celebrate the 25th year of the Web,  in the opera blog has assembled 25 facts he thinks to be of interest:

1989: Tim Berners-Lee and the team at CERN invented the World Wide Web.

1990: The Archie Search Engine was created at McGill University. It is considered to be the first internet search engine.

1991The first ever website went live.

1992: The phrase surfing the internet was coined by Jean Armour Polly.

1993: The Mosaic web browser, often described as the first graphical web browser, was launched.

1994: Yahoo! was launched. It first came out as a web directory.

1995: Opera was born! We turned 18 years old last year.

1996: Nokia released its first phone with internet access, the Nokia 9000 Communicator.

1997BabelFish, the first automatic-translation application, was launched.

1998: The Google search engine was born.

1999: Napster was launched, changing the way we find and consume music online.

2000:  By 2000, over 20 million websites were up and running.

2001: The first Wikipedia article was published.

2002: Social-networking site Friendster was launched. Today, Friendster now runs as a social-gaming site.

2003: Skype, a voice and video-calling service, was released.

2004: Facebook went online.

2005: The first ever video on YouTube was uploaded. It has a guy and a zoo in it.

2006: Twttr was launched. It’s now called Twitter today and is one of the most used social media services.

2007: Apple released the iPhone, changing the way people use mobile browsers.

2008: Dropbox was launched at TechCrunch50.

2009: WhatsApp, a cross-platform mobile messaging app, was launched.

2010: Instagram was launched. Now, we could finally take pictures of our food.

2011: Google+ was released. It was first launched as an invite-only service.

2012: More than 115,000 websites participated in the largest online protest in history. It was aprotest against internet censorship bills SOPA and PIPA.

2013:, a project by Facebook in partnership with Opera and other technology companies, was announced. Its aim is to connect the next 5 billion people online.

2014: The year has just begun! What do you think is the most important event so far?

Big Data Events

The Big Data discussion builds momentum in Official Statistics.

In October 2012 at the UNECE High-level Seminar on Modernization of Statistical Production and Services (HLG) in St.Petersburg Big Data popped up. A strategic paper was asked for.

22 February 2013 the United Nations Statistics Division’s (UNSD) organised the Friday Seminar on Emerging Issues, especially Big Data.

Soon after a very good paper on Big Data was delivered by the HLG.

And in September 2013 the Heads of European Statistical Offices (DGINS Directors General of the National Statistical Institutes) adopted the Scheveningen Memorandum.

Scheveningen Memorandum
Big Data and Official Statistics

1. Recent innovations in the information and communication technologies have been leading to an increasing degree of digitization of economies and societies at all levels that offer new opportunities for the compilation of statistics.
2. The use of Big Data for statistical purposes challenges the European Statistical System to effectively address a variety of issues.
3. The demand for timely and cost efficient production of high quality statistical data increases, as well the need for new solutions to declining response levels.
4. Official statistics should incorporate as much as possible all potential data sources, including Big Data, into their conceptual design.
5. The distinguishing aspect of many Big Data sources is that they are not confined to national borders and, as such, represent unique opportunities for collaboration at European level as well as on global level.
6. Many European initiatives have a link to Big Data, including the European
Commission’s ambition for developing a strategy for the European data value chain, the on-going EU Data Protection reform and the Horizon2020 program.
7. The implementation of new methods of production of European statistics represents an objective of the European Statistical Programme 2013-2017 (1) and aims at efficiency gains and quality improvements, including increased timeliness.

(1) Regulation (EU) No 99/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 January 2013 on the European statistical programme 2013-17, OJ L 39, 9.2.2013, p. 12–29

1. Acknowledge that Big Data represent new opportunities and challenges for Official Statistics, and therefore encourage the European Statistical System and its partners to effectively examine the potential of Big Data sources in that regard.
2. Recognise that Big Data is a phenomenon which is impacting on many policy areas. It is therefore essential to develop an ‘Official Statistics Big Data strategy‘ and to examine the place and the interdependencies of this strategy within the wider context of an overall government strategy at national as well as at EU level.
3. Recognise that the implications of Big Data for legislation especially with regard to data protection and personal rights (e.g. access to Big Data sources held by third parties) should be properly addressed as a matter of priority in a coordinated manner.
4. Note that several NSIs are currently initiating or considering different uses of Big Data in a national context. There is a momentum to share experiences obtained from concrete Big Data projects and to collaborate within the ESS and beyond, on a global level.
5. Recognise that developing the necessary capabilities and skills to effectively explore Big Data is essential for their integration into the European Statistical System. This requires systematic efforts like appropriate training courses and establishing dedicated communities including academics for sharing experiences and best practice.
6. Acknowledge that the multidisciplinary character of Big Data requires synergies and partnerships to be effectively built with experts and stakeholders from various
domains including government, academics and owners of private data sources.
7. Acknowledge that the use of Big Data in the context of official statistics requires new developments in methodology, quality assessment and IT related issues. The European Statistical System should make a special effort to supports these
8. Agree on the importance of following up the implementation of this memorandum by adopting an ESS action plan and roadmap by mid-2014 that should be further integrated into the Statistical Annual Work Programmes of Eurostat.’

ESS Big Data Event Roma 2014

And now comes the ESS Big Data Event from  31 March-1 April 2014. It offers keynotes and seminars dealing with several of the Scheveningen topics. See the programme and the concept paper.

The European Data Forum (EDF) Athens 2014

Some days before the ESS Event the annual European Data Forum will take place in Athens, March 19-20 2014. Big Data will be a topic there, too.


A practical example: Using Social media analysis for statistics

During the DGINS meeting 2013 in the Netherlands some examples of Big Data usage for statistical insights were accessible as presentations.
The Dutch Statistical Office CBS and Coosto the social media monitoring and engagement tool dived into the digital ocean of social media data and made some comparisons.





Big data and official statisics: A conclusion from Els Rijnierse’s  presentation on traffic big data:


Waiting for Don’t Panic

‘Internationally acclaimed Swedish Professor Hans Rosling will present Don’t Panic – The Truth About Population, an ‘as-live’ studio event featuring cutting-edge infographics, as part of a short series of programmes exploring global population trends for BBC Two’s international current affairs strand This World.’


And while waiting enjoy Hans Rosling’s Joy of Stats.

IMAODBC 2013: And the winner is …

The Best-Presentation Award of the International Marketing and Output Database Conference IMAODBC 2013 in Neuchâtel/Switzerland goes to Ilka Willand from the  German Federal Statistical Office destatis.

Ilka presented the reputation analysis 2013 of destatis which aims at getting information about  target groups for statistical information – also the ones not reached (yet).

Target Groups

There’s a new target group approach:

2013-09-28_Willand-targetgroupsFirst results (more to come later)

First results of the not yet finished survey show how these groups search statistical information and how they want to access this information (green: preferred behaviour, red: not preferred behaviour).
Interesting: In Germany social media are considered to be for private use only, not for accessing official statistics .. :


2013-09-28_Willand-firstresukts03Here is the full presentation (link)


And now: Semantic Statistics (SemStats)

Official Statistics has a long tradition in creating and providing high-quality metadata. And the Semantic Web needs just this: metadata!

So it’s not surprising that these two find together, more and more.
A special workshop will be organized during the The 12th International Semantic Web Conference ISWC, 21-25 October 2013, Sydney, Australia.

It is the 1st International Workshop on Semantic Statistics (SemStats 2013) organized by Raphaël Troncy (EURECOM), Franck Cotton (INSEE), Richard Cyganiak (DERI), Armin Haller(CSIRO) and Alistair Hamilton (ABS).

ISWC 2013 is the premier international forum for the Semantic Web / Linked Data Community. Here, scientists, industry specialists, and practitioners meet to discuss the future of practical, scalable, user-friendly, and game changing solutions.’

The workshop summary

How to publish linked statistics? And: How to use linked data for statistics? These are the key questions of this workshop.

‘The goal of this workshop is to explore and strengthen the relationship between the Semantic Web and statistical communities, to provide better access to the data held by statistical offices. It will focus on ways in which statisticians can use Semantic Web technologies and standards in order to formalize, publish, document and link their data and metadata.

The statistics community faces sometimes challenges when trying to adopt Semantic Web technologies, in particular:

  • difficulty to create and publish linked data: this can be alleviated by providing methods, tools, lessons learned and best practices, by publicizing successful examples and by providing support.
  • difficulty to see the purpose of publishing linked data: we must develop end-user tools leveraging statistical linked data, provide convincing examples of real use in applications or mashups, so that the end-user value of statistical linked data and metadata appears more clearly.
  • difficulty to use external linked data in their daily activity: it is important do develop statistical methods and tools especially tailored for linked data, so that statisticians can get accustomed to using them and get convinced of their specific utility.’

A tradition

RDF, Triples, Linked Data … these are topics statisticians already treated and adapted. But rather on an individual track and not as an organization.

This blog has a lot of information about Semantic Web and Official Statistics, about 40 posts since 2007.

See this post (2012) with a recent paper from Statistics Switzerland (where a study on publishing linked data has just been finished in collaboration with the Bern University of Applied Sciences):

Or this (2009) about SDMX and RDF or about LOD activities in 2009: