Easy-to-understand Statistics for the Public

In a recently published EUROSTAT publication, the authors demand innovative forms of communication from public statistics in order not to lose their socially important role. Among other things, they demand ‘…. to tell stories close to the people; to create communities around specific themes; to develop among citizens the ability to read the data and understand what is behind the statistical process.’

Telling Stories

The UNECE hackathon that has just been completed responds to this challenge.
‘A hackathon is an intensive problem-solving event. In this case, the focus is on statistical content and effective communication. The teams will be challenged to “Create a user-oriented product that tells a story about the younger population”. During the Hackathon, fifteen teams from nine countries had 64.5 hours to create a product that tells a story about the younger population. The teams were multidisciplinary – with members from statistical offices and other government departments. The product created should be innovative, engaging, and targeted towards the general public (that is, not specialists). There was no limit on the form of the product, but the teams had to include a mandatory SDG indicator in the product.
The mandatory indicator was “Proportion of youth (aged 15-24 years) not in education, employment or training” SDG indicator (Indicator 8.6.1).‘ (Source)

Winners

And the hackathon shows impressive results, even if only a few organisations have participated.

The four winners are:

My Favourites

My favourites are number 3 from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI-Mexico) and number 2 from the Central Statistical Office of Poland.

Why?

The Mexican solution…

…is aesthetically pleasing and easy to use. The interaction is left to the user and can be individually controlled by him/her in the speed.

The diagrams do not stand alone, but are explained by short texts while scrolling.

The results are not just being accepted. Rather, the concepts are explained and questioned – statistics are presented with the methodological background.

The Polish solution…

…starts with a jourmalistic approach. Here too, the interactivity can be controlled by the user at the desired speed.

At the end, the authors also seek direct contact with the users; a quiz personalizes the statistical data and gives an individual assessment of where the users stand personally with regard to these statistics.

Success Factors

The two applications mentioned above combine decisive user-friendly features:
– visually attractive,
– easy-to-understand navigation that can be controlled by the user according to his needs,
– the journalistic approach,
– concise and instructive explanations,
– personalization,
– hints on the methodological background.

Many of the other applications show the frequently encountered weaknesses: Too much information should be provided, no courage to leave something behind and concentrate on the most important elements. And this leads to long texts and complex navigation with the effect that users quit quickly.

Advertisements

Today – Statsday

October 20th is the day of Official Statistics. It’s the day to highlight the importance of reliable, independent and high-quality numbers. Numbers that help to make good, evidence-based decisions.

This year “Better data, better lives” is the theme of the World Statistics Day selected by the United Nations General Assembly.

https://worldstatisticsday.org/

Many countries also celebrate this day and are planning special events. The new  UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be the focus of most of these events.

My World: The new development agenda

The new development agenda of UN

To know people’s priorities and views for a better life is the aim of the global survey lead actually by the UN.

2014-04-26_My_World-survey
The results will help defining the next development agenda for the world after the Millenium Development Goals MDG.

2014-04-26_MDG

 

.

Results of My World Survey by April 2014

2014-04-26_My_World-results

http://data.myworld2015.org/

All about

Here you can fnd more about the background of the post-2015 global development agenda

 

For Everyone

The World Wide Web’s birthday! (webat25.org). And a greeting address from Tim Bernetrs-Lee:

2014-03-13_webat25-video

‘By working together, I believe we can build a Web that truly is for everyone: one that is accessible to all, from any device, and one that empowers all of us to achieve our dignity, rights and potential as humans. Let’s use this landmark birthday as a crucial step on that path.’ (T. B-L)

World Wide! World Wide?

.

2014-03-13_webwewant‘ the actions of some companies and some governments threaten our fundamental freedoms on the Web.’ https://webwewant.org

A segmented WWW is no longer a WWW.

 

Some events in WWW’s curriculum

To celebrate the 25th year of the Web,  in the opera blog has assembled 25 facts he thinks to be of interest:

1989: Tim Berners-Lee and the team at CERN invented the World Wide Web.

1990: The Archie Search Engine was created at McGill University. It is considered to be the first internet search engine.

1991The first ever website went live.

1992: The phrase surfing the internet was coined by Jean Armour Polly.

1993: The Mosaic web browser, often described as the first graphical web browser, was launched.

1994: Yahoo! was launched. It first came out as a web directory.

1995: Opera was born! We turned 18 years old last year.

1996: Nokia released its first phone with internet access, the Nokia 9000 Communicator.

1997BabelFish, the first automatic-translation application, was launched.

1998: The Google search engine was born.

1999: Napster was launched, changing the way we find and consume music online.

2000:  By 2000, over 20 million websites were up and running.

2001: The first Wikipedia article was published.

2002: Social-networking site Friendster was launched. Today, Friendster now runs as a social-gaming site.

2003: Skype, a voice and video-calling service, was released.

2004: Facebook went online.

2005: The first ever video on YouTube was uploaded. It has a guy and a zoo in it.

2006: Twttr was launched. It’s now called Twitter today and is one of the most used social media services.

2007: Apple released the iPhone, changing the way people use mobile browsers.

2008: Dropbox was launched at TechCrunch50.

2009: WhatsApp, a cross-platform mobile messaging app, was launched.

2010: Instagram was launched. Now, we could finally take pictures of our food.

2011: Google+ was released. It was first launched as an invite-only service.

2012: More than 115,000 websites participated in the largest online protest in history. It was aprotest against internet censorship bills SOPA and PIPA.

2013: Internet.org, a project by Facebook in partnership with Opera and other technology companies, was announced. Its aim is to connect the next 5 billion people online.

2014: The year has just begun! What do you think is the most important event so far?