Open, Useful, Reusable

In OECD’s brand new publication ‘Government at a Glance 2015’ we can find a new indicator: The OUR Index. It stands for ‘Open, Useful, Reusable Government Data’.

‘The new OECD OURdata Index reveals that many countries have made progress in making public data more available and accessible, but large variations remain, not least with respect to the quality of data provided. Governments need to make participation initiatives more accessible, targeted, relevant and appealing.’ (p.8)


‘The data come from the 2014 OECD Survey on Open Government Data. Survey respondents were predominantly chief information officers in OECD countries and two candidate countries (Colombia and Latvia). Responses represent countries’ own assessments of current practices and procedures regarding open government data. Data refer only to central/federal governments and exclude open government data practices at the state/local levels.’ (p.150)


Based on G8 recommendations

‘The OECD OURdata Index measures government efforts to implement the G8 Open Data charter based on the availability, accessibility and government support to promote the reuse of data, focusing on the central OGD portal in each country'( p.33)

‘The G8 Open Data Charter defines a series of five principles: 1) open data by default; 2) quality and quantity data; 3) usable by all; 4) releasing data for improved governance and; 5) releasing data for innovation, as well as three collective actions to guide the implementation of those principles.’
‘As a first step in producing a comprehensive measure of the level of implementation of the G8 Open Data Charter, the OECD pilot Index on Open government data assesses governments’ efforts to implement open data in three dimensions:
1. Data availability on the national portal (based on principle 1 and collective action 2);
2. Data accessibility on the national portal (based on principle 3) and
3. Governments’ support to innovative re-use and stakeholder engagement (principle 5).
The only principle not covered in this year’s index is Principle 4: Releasing Data for improved governance value (e.g. transparency) as existing measurement efforts have focused primarily on socio economic value creation’ (p.150)


And here comes the ranking

2015-07-10-OURdataIndexData for this chart:

Detailed data for the countries:

The publication

The publication: OECD (2015), Government at a Glance 2015, OECD Publishing, Paris.


Methods changed – Information changed

The joint OECD – WTO Trade in Value-Added Initiative breaks with conventional measurements of  trade, which record gross flows of goods and services each time they cross borders. It seeks instead to analyse the value added by a country in the production of any good or service that is then exported, and offers a fuller picture of commercial relations between nations.

The new methodology and its results are visually explained. Video and an interactive presentation give beautifully made insights.


Open data: Waiting ….

UK and US governments support open data … not only in their own countries. In an official letter they ask OECD to join this movement.

‘On behalf of US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and UK Foreign Secretary William Hague, the heads of the two countries’ missions to the OECD delivered a letter this week to the Organisation’s Secretary General, Angel Gurría. In it, Mrs Clinton and Mr Hague called on the OECD to commit to the principles of the Open Government Partnership, and make all of its core data freely available online. ‘


Awaiting an answer ……..



in Warsaw there was held the OGDcamp 2011.
Waiting for the keynotes posted …



An instructive introduction to Open data.


And …

a key message

from Vincenzo Patrunos presentation at ISTAT for the Italian Statistics Day (yes! October 20th !!) where were discussed about Open Data and Open Government  during the workshop “Open Official Statistical Data”.

The same from his presentation at IMAODBC 2011. Have a look at it.

Waiting for the paper …. -;)



OECD Regions at a Glance 2011 – Interactive edition

Education levels, employment opportunities and health resources across regions. How do they vary? Why do they matter?This interactive edition of OECD Regions at a Glance unlocks the wealth of information behind this book to help you better see, understand and explore the range of data and findings that shape our regions.You can navigate both the latest comparable data and past trends across regions in OECD countries and emerging economies on a range of economic, social, demographic and environmental topics via interactive maps and graphs, shareable data and country links.

OECD Regions at a Glance has been offering a statistical snapshot of how life is lived – and can be improved – from region to region in the OECD area since 2005.

To get started, click on the chapter titles above.

Better Life Index

Housingincomejobscommunity,educationenvironmentgovernancehealthlife satisfactionsafety,work-life balance – these are the indicators proposed in OECD’s Better Life Index .

In a interactive tool, Your Better Life Index, OECD enables participants to rate their country on the things they feel make for a better life.  ‘ The Index allows citizens to compare well-being across 34 countries, based on 11 dimensions the OECD has identified as essential, in the areas of material living conditions and quality of life’.

More about this initiative and esurvey on OECD’s website.


NComVA: Enable anyone to easily create and share interactive statistics news through our recognized Publishing tools

Statistics eXplorer help you discover patterns and insight to provide the basis for better understanding and decisions with the same tools and methodologies that today are used by our customers OECD, Eurostat, World Bank and many national and regional statistics bureaus. Passing on knowledge from your analysis and storytelling through our Publisher Statistics to your website or blog using a Flash based dynamic visualization. Statistics Explorer represents a unique and elegant layout where the visualization is in focus and user interfaces reside invisible in the background. An effective combination of time-linked views can simultaneously analyze and visualize data and help you make the right decision when you need to know more about national or regional statistics.
Customizable (Open) Statistics eXplorer is the generic version of Statistics eXplorer for customizing statistics visualization applications for any regions and their related indicators. Our standard products World eXplorer (nations), Europe eXplorer (NUTS2 and NUTS3) and Sweden eXplorer (counties and municipalities) integrate data from official databases (World Bank, Eurostat, Statistics Sweden, SKL, etc.) with your own indicators and let you, for example, compare your regions of interest with others.